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Preservation of Place: The Art of Edward Rice

August 27, 2011 - November 20, 2011

 

Organized by the Morris Museum of Art, Preservation of Place: The Art of Edward Rice opened August 27, 2011 at the Morris Museum. This exhibition features thirty paintings produced since 1982 by the noted realist, drawn from private and public collections from across the south. One of the most inclusive overviews of Rice's career to-date, the exhibition remains on display through November 20, 2011.

"His painterly skills, combined with the instincts of a serious architectural historian, have combined to create a body of work that is noteworthy for its elegance, precision, and devotion to the telling detail. His depiction of the obvious and the forgotten, the historic and generic -- the often overlooked -- is more than a simple architectural record" said Kevin Grogan, director of the Morris Museum of Art. "These images haunt the imagination and mirror the lost architecture of the Old South. They preserve a sense of self as much as they do a sense of Southern history."

 

Artist Biography

Born and raised in North Augusta, South Carolina, Edward Rice began to study art at an early age in North Augusta. He crossed the Savannah River to continue his studies in Augusta, Georgia, at the Gertrude Herbert Institute of Art and at Augusta College with painters Eugenia Comer, David Jones, and Freeman Schoolcraft, who became his particular friend and mentor.

After studying with Schoolcraft, Rice commenced his own teaching career and became director and artist-in-residence at the Gertrude Herbert Institute of Art. Then, in 1982, he left that position to focus exclusively on his own art. He established a studio in a building near the Savannah River and, for the first time, began painting architectural subjects exclusively-depicting the historic structures that surrounded and inspired him. In 1990 he relocated his studio to its current location in North Augusta in a building that once served that community as its jail.

His long-ago decision to devote his life to painting was fateful. He has become a much-recognized painter whose work is represented in public and private collections around the world. He is a past recipient of a South Carolina Arts Commission Artist Fellowship and a National Endowment for the Arts/Southern Arts Federation Regional Fellowship. His paintings have been included in exhibitions at Babcock Galleries, New York; Gerald Peters Gallery, Santa Fe; and Heath Gallery, Atlanta; among others. His work is included in the collections of the Gibbes Museum of Art, the Columbia Museum of Art, the South Carolina State Museum, the Greenville County Museum of Art in South Carolina; the Georgia Museum of Art and the Morris Museum of Art in Georgia; and the Ogden Museum of Southern Art in New Orleans.

Preservation of Place: The Art of Edward Rice will be accompanied by a ninety-six page catalogue of the same title. Produced and published by the Morris Museum of Art, the exhibition catalogue is available for purchase through the Morris Museum of Art store.

 

Wall panel for the exhibition

Edward Rice, a native of North Augusta, South Carolina, began to study art at a very early age. Between 1963 and 1966, he took drawing and watercolor lessons from Edith Alexander in North Augusta and learned how to paint from Louise Mallard at the Gertrude Herbert Institute of Art in Augusta. Beginning in 1972, he continued his studies at Augusta College under the tutelage of Eugenia Comer, David Jones, and Freeman Schoolcraft, who became his particular friend and mentor. He left Augusta College when Schoolcraft retired in 1974 and continued to study with him privately as his acknowledged protégé.

After five years with Schoolcraft, Rice commenced his own teaching career and became director and artist-in-residence at the Gertrude Herbert Institute of Art. In 1982, he left to focus exclusively on his own art and began painting the architectural subjects for which he's become famous. Eventually, he relocated his studio from downtown Augusta to North Augusta, where he continues to work to this day.

His work is included in many public, private, and corporate collections, including those of the Columbia Museum of Art, the Georgia Museum of Art, the Gibbes Museum of Art, the Greenville County Museum of Art, the Morris Museum of Art, the Ogden Museum of Southern Art, and the South Carolina State Museum.

His painterly skills have combined with the instincts of a serious architectural historian to create a body of work that is noteworthy for its elegance, precision, and devotion to the telling detail. His depiction of the obvious and the forgotten, the historic and generic -- the often overlooked -- is more than a simple architectural record. These images haunt the imagination and mirror the lost architecture of the Old South. They preserve a sense of self as much as they do a sense of Southern history.

The exhibition and the publication that accompanies it have been made possible by the generous support of Mr. and Mrs. Hale Barrett, Mrs. Jacquelyn Blanchard, Mrs. Ann Boardman, Mr. Albert Cheatham, Dr. and Mrs. F. Marion Durst III, Mr. and Mrs. Bernard Finn, Ms. Fredericka Flynt, Mr. and Mrs. William Hopkins, Dr. and Mrs. James Hudson, and Dr. and Mrs. Michael Shlaer.

Preservation of Place: The Art of Edward Rice is accompanied by a fully illustrated catalogue, published by the Morris Museum of Art. It contains essays by Jeffrey Day, David Houston, and Martha Severens. It is available at the Morris Museum store.

The exhibition remains on view through November 20, 2011.


Images of artworks from the exhibition

 

(above: Edward Rice, Dormer, 1984-1987. Morris Museum of Art, Augusta, Georgia. Courtesy of the artist.)

 

(above: Edward Rice, Charleston Cupola, 2011. Private Collector. Image Courtesy of the artist.)

 

(above: Edward Rice, Ice House, 2010. Private Collector. Image courtesy of the artist.)

 

Essays from the exhibition catalogue

 

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