Milwaukee Art Museum

Milwaukee, WI




The Milwaukee Art Museum includes the Santiago Calatrava-designed Quadracci Pavilion, completed in October, 2001 and named by Time magazine "Best Design of 2001"; renovated and reinstalled permanent collection galleries; and elegant public gardens designed by noted landscape architect Dan Kiley. The Museum's 2001 expansion provided a 30 percent increase in overall gallery space, enhanced educational and public programming facilities, and expanded public amenities. (left: Milwaukee Art Museum , night view. Photo: Timothy Hursley)

The Milwaukee Art Museum's far-reaching holdings include more than 20,000 works spanning antiquity to the present day. With a history dating back to 1888, the Museum's primary strengths are in 19th- and 20th-century American and European art, contemporary art, American decorative arts, Old Master works, and folk and self-taught art.

The Milwaukee Art Museum had its origin in two institutions, the Layton Art Gallery, established in 1888, and the Milwaukee Art Institute, founded in the early 1900s. These two institutions joined forces in 1957 to form the private, non-profit Milwaukee Art Center (now the Milwaukee Art Museum), and moved to its current location in downtown Milwaukee, along the shore of Lake Michigan, at 750 North Lincoln Memorial Drive, Milwaukee, WI, 53202. (right: Milwaukee Art Museum entrance. Photo: Timothy Hursley)


See a 3:43 minute video on the museum.

Hours and fees are available on the Museum's website.

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